Special Voter Circumstances

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Voting


In compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), each early and Election Day voting site offers handicap entrance ramps, wheelchair accessible voting booths, magnifying lenses, and ballot marking equipment.

When using the ballot marking equipment, you can choose to have the ballot displayed on a large-print screen or read to you through headphones. You can customize the font size, screen contrast, volume, and speed of speech. The terminal also accommodates sip-and-puff tube technology.

Privately, you use the touch-screen feature or arrow keys to navigate through the ballot choices and make selections unassisted. After you confirm a summary of your choices, the terminal will mark the ballot and return to it to you for placement in the ballot bin.

If you have difficulty physically entering either the early or Election Day voting site, you may want to take advantage of the voting by mail option. You only need to walk to your mailbox to receive and cast your ballot. Click here for a  Voting by Mail application.

Demonstration of the ballot marking equipment can be scheduled through the County Clerk’s office by calling 847.377.2314.

insert ballot in ADA equipment  ADA Ballot on screen

Assisted Voter


Under Illinois law you qualify for receiving assistance in marking your ballot only If you are blind, physically disabled, or unable to read or write the English or Spanish language. You are free to select the person who helps you such as an election judge, family member, friend, or another voter. You may not ask an agent of your employer or union. State law prohibits a candidate whose name appears on the ballot (unless you are the spouse, parent, child, brother or sister of the candidate) from assisting you.

The person assisting must mark the ballot exactly as you direct and not reveal any of your choices. Any individual attempting to influence your choice of candidates, party, public questions, or to mark the ballot other than as directed, may be guilty of a Class 3 Felony. If you can’t or don’t express your intent, assistance cannot be given to mark the ballot in any way.

Assisted Voter – By Mail


The person assisting must complete the assisted voter portion on your certification envelope.

Assisted Voter – Voting Site


Only one voter at a time is allowed in a single voting booth. Young children may accompany you to the voting booth.

An Assisted Voter Affidavit must be completed by the election judge, the person selected to assist, and you.

Challenged Voted


A challenge may be made by election judges, other registered voters in the voting site or poll watchers with valid credentials. Three of the most common reasons you could be challenged include:

  • Your signatures are substantially different on your application and voter registration record.
  • It is believed that you no longer reside at your registration address.
  • It is believed that you are not the person you claim to be.

Challenged Voter – By mail


When voting by mail, be sure to insert your voted ballot in the certification envelope and sign the front of the envelope before mailing it back to the Clerk’s office.

You will be contacted if:
  • Your signature on your ballot application does not match your voter registration record,
  • Certification envelope is missing, or
  • Certification envelope is not signed.

Challenged Voter – Voting site


If challenged, you would be required to:
  • Provide two forms of current identification.
  • Give sworn oath that the information you provide is true, and correct and you are qualified to vote.
  • Provide a current signature for updating your registration record.
If you cannot provide the required identification or refuse to give the sworn oath, you may not cast a ballot. Challenged voters are eligible to be processed as a provisional voter after taking an oath.

Curbside Voting


If you are handicapped or elderly and cannot physically enter the voting site, you may request voting assistance outside the room for voting, usually at curbside in a car.

You should notify our office of this request by calling (847) 377-2406 at least one day in advance of Election Day.

Hospitalized or Nursing Home Voter


if you are admitted to a hospital, nursing home, or rehabilitation center within 14 days before Election Day, you may qualify for personal delivery of a ballot by a friend or family member, subject to statutory conditions.

You must complete the request form, Application for Ballot for Qualified Voter Admitted to a Hospital, Nursing Home or Rehabilitation Center. Your physician is required to complete the accompanying Affidavit of Attending Physician.

Forms are available by contacting Mary Ann Potter of the Lake County Clerk’s office at mpotter@lakecountyil.gov or 847.377.2311.

All required forms must be completed and returned to the Lake County Clerk's office prior to the application and ballot being issued. 

If your friend or family member is unable to deliver the forms and ballot, you may want to take advantage of the voting by mail option. You only need to walk to your mailbox to receive and cast your ballot. Click here for a Voting by Mail application.
Hospitalized Voter
 

Provisional Voting

Some of the most common circumstances when a provisional ballot is issued:

  • You are not found as registered and cannot provide required ID or witness.
  • You are challenged by a poll watcher in the voting site, and you cannot provide required ID or a witness.
  • Voting time is extended by court order.
  • Voting for the first time after you registered by mail, did not provide required ID with your registration, and cannot provide ID when voting.
  • You are marked as having voted during early voting.
  • You requested and received a ballot by mail but cannot surrender it to the election judges.
  • You’re wishing to register with your current address but cannot provide required ID or a witness.
  • You insist on voting at incorrect Election Day voting site.
In the voting site, you and the election judge will complete a Provisional Voter Affidavit Envelope. The election judge will give you a ballot and the affidavit envelope. After marking your ballot, you seal it in the provisional affidavit envelope and return it to the election judge. Your ballot is NOT placed in the ballot bin.

All provisional ballot envelopes are returned to the County Clerk’s office AFTER Election Day. You have seven days to provide the Clerk’s office with any additional identification or documents to prove your name and/or address. We work with Illinois State Board of Elections, the Secretary of State’s office, and any new papers provided by you to determine your registration status. If your status can be proven, your ballot is counted.  If your name and/or address cannot be validated, your provisional ballot is not cast.

Track the status of your provisional ballot by logging into LakeVoterPower.info and referencing the ballot access number on your white Provisional Voter Ballot Receipt.
 Provisional Ballot Envelope Receipt-Completed